matt walshI cringe when I see friends post and share links to Matt Walsh’s blog. Not because I’ve never posted cringe-worthy stuff — I’ve done plenty, even recently. But I cringe because I think Matt Walsh’s writing is usually bad for the soul.

And I’m concerned that he may not be having a good effect on people I love and respect.

If you’re not familiar with Matt Walsh, he’s a young, conservative, religious blogger whose specialty is 1,200+ word diatribes about social issues. He’s kind of a young, male, religious version of Ann Coulter.

While Walsh is articulate and makes a number of points I agree with, here are three reasons why I believe the overall effect of his work is soul-shrinking.

1. Walsh’s writing lacks the fruit of the Spirit, especially love.

With the possible exception of faithfulness, the majority of Walsh’s writing lacks the fruit of the Spirit: love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness and self-control.

In particular, Walsh’s tone rarely reflects the supreme Christian virtue of love. Now, he would likely disagree and say that it’s loving to point out error, and I agree that it is (which is why I’m writing this). But it’s unloving to point out error in a way that is unloving.

It’s a bit like the street-preacher I witnessed in college who–when challenged by a gay activist about love–shouted, “I do love you, you miserable wretch!”

Consider these Biblical passages and ask whether love matters:

And if I have prophetic powers, and understand all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but have not love, I am nothing. (1 Corinthians 13:2 ESV)

A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another: just as I have loved you, you also are to love one another. By this all people will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another.” (John 13:34-35 ESV)

The aim of our charge is love that issues from a pure heart and a good conscience and a sincere faith. (1 Timothy 1:5 ESV)

For a Christian to imbibe and celebrate arguments that reflect truth but almost completely lack grace runs contrary to the goal of spiritual growth (love) and the model of Jesus (John 1:14).

[Note: I'm not saying that Walsh lacks the fruit of the Spirit in his personal life--I don't know him. I'm only discussing the tone of his writing.]

UPDATE: One reader wondered if I could cite any specific examples. Here’s one: In a recent post titled, “Police officers aren’t the ones destroying the black community,” Walsh criticized somebody as “a ridiculous fool,” “a liar,” and “a lunatic” with “an enormous dose of idiocy.” This name-calling is mean-spirited and harsh.

2. Walsh’s specialty is making a point rather than a difference.

Andy Stanley was the first person I heard say, “It’s always easier to make a point than it is to make a difference.”

Christians are invited to make a difference in this world. We are adopted by the Father, justified by the Son and indwelled by the Holy Spirit. We are loved with excessive, scandalous, prodigal grace. This propels us to offer our lives as living sacrifices to God, living in ways that are transformed by him rather than conformed to the world. Through love, service and relationship we have an opportunity to make a difference.

Or we can just make a point.

Matt Walsh is all about making a point. And, often, his point is a good one.

My concern is that in an increasingly divided ideological world — where we can always find somebody to listen to who we agree with — Christians will follow Matt Walsh’s lead, thinking that as long as they said the right thing they were faithful, even though little difference is made.

Rather than Walsh’s model, we should follow the Apostle Paul’s instruction:

Have nothing to do with foolish, ignorant controversies; you know that they breed quarrels. And the Lord’s servant must not be quarrelsome but kind to everyone, able to teach, patiently enduring evil, correcting his opponents with gentleness. God may perhaps grant them repentance leading to a knowledge of the truth, and they may come to their senses and escape from the snare of the devil, after being captured by him to do his will. (2 Timothy 2:23-26 ESV)

Note that this doesn’t mean criticism (“correcting opponents”) is bad itself. It means that correcting opponents in a quarrelsome, unkind way is a problem.

3. Walsh’s blog confirms all the suspicions skeptics have toward Christians.

In his book, unChristian, David Kinnaman lists the assumptions that many non-Christian people have about Christians that–according to them–make Christianity less desirable:

  • Christians are hypocritical
  • Christians don’t have meaningful relationships with non-Christians
  • Christians are antihomosexual
  • Christians are sheltered from the world
  • Christians are too political
  • Christians are too judgmental

Whether Christians agree about these perceptions, they exist. And Matt Walsh’s tone plays right into every one.

As one thoughtful reviewer suggested, image-management isn’t really the primary goal Christians should have. No matter how faithfully we follow Jesus, we will always be misunderstood and misrepresented.

Nonetheless, Christians should know that publicly sharing Walsh’s posts will likely decrease, rather than increase, the effectiveness of their witness. If you have skeptical friends who follow you online (like I do), sharing articles that lack love and make a point instead of a difference will not help influence friends the way you might think.

Conclusion

Adults will read and share what they want. I have no interest in policing the media that people consume, like and promote. But as a pastor who wants to see Christians grow in their love and make a greater difference in a skeptical world, I’m concerned that reading Matt Walsh will be counter-productive.

Agree? Disagree? I’d love to hear your thoughts.

 

Read the lessons from Day 1 here.

Day 2 of the Global Leadership Summit was great. Because of some other commitments, I was only able to attend the afternoon — but it was still worthwhile. In fact, my 8 year old daughter joined me for the afternoon and asked if she could come to the whole thing next year because it was so interesting. Below are the lessons from Day 2.

leadership summit

Ivan SatyravataTHE POWER PARADOX | IVAN SATYAVRATA

#1 – The western church has something to learn from the rest of the world — after all, it’s bigger.

“Thank you for being humble enough to listen to the voices from the majority world.”

#2 – Leadership inevitably involves power. What matters is whether you use the power to serve others.

“There is no leadership without power. Great leaders hold a scepter in one hand an a towel in the other.”

 

tylerperryWHEN LEADERSHIP MEETS INSPIRATION | AN INTERVIEW WITH TYLER PERRY

#1 – Attitude matters more than talent.

Better to pass over the most qualified person with a bad attitude and take the less qualified person with the best attitude.

#2 – Forgiveness is harder than people make it sound.

It takes a tremendous amount of energy to experience abuse and betrayal and the same amount of energy to forgive the abuser—you can’t just flip a switch.

#3 – Laughter is a huge leadership asset.

You can use laughter as anesthesia to prepare for the real message.

#4 – God is with you even when there is criticism.

“The Bible says that God prepares blessing in the presence of our enemies. So when I’m criticized, I just think, ‘OK, watch me eat.’”

*Note: This session was the surprise highlight of the event for me. I was really impressed by Tyler Perry and it made me want to watch more of his work.

 

Louie GiglioTHE MOUNTAIN | LOUIE GIGLIO

#1 – God works despite our uncertainty and incompetence.

“Just because I don’t feel like I know what I’m doing doesn’t mean that God doesn’t have something amazing planned.”

#2 – It’s often more helpful to focus on the next step than the whole journey.

“You don’t have to know everything about how to get up the mountain, you just need to take a next step.”

I’m thankful to the folks at Central Christian Church for hosting a terrific event and for their generosity in allowing me to attend. If you ever get a chance to attend the Global Leadership Summit, you should.

Had a great day yesterday at the Willow Creek Global Leadership Summit. It’s a fantastic event and I’m thankful for the hosts of our closest Summit location extending me an invitation and paying my way. Below are the lessons from my three favorite sessions on Day 1.

leadership summit

hybels2014HARD FOUGHT LEADERSHIP LESSONS | BILL HYBELS

Lesson #1 — The spirit of the team is more important than the power of the vision.

“Your culture will only ever be as healthy as the senior leader wants it to be.”

Lesson #2 — Great leadership is, by definition, relentlessly developmental.

When is the last time you’ve assigned a young leader to an important task to test and invest in them?

Lesson #3 — You must learn to discern between hirelings and owners.

Owners will care about the culture, endure the rough patches, think about long-term financial viability, develop leaders—because they care about the long-term vision.

Lesson #4 — Endure

We get one shot at this thing called life. Our lives are the dash between the two dates on our headstone. You can live and lead small, safe, selfishly. Or you can choose to pursue a bigger vision for the good of others that leaves something beautiful behind.

loritts2014INSTIGATING CHANGE THROUGH PERSONAL SACRIFICE | BRYAN LORITTS

#1 — Ministry isn’t the only meaningful way to impact the world.

“Your vocation can become a viable vehicle to advance the meaningful truths of live.”

#2 – I can’t claim to have God’s heart and do nothing for the least of these.

“The blessing of God is not meant to be hoarded but shared.”

 

lencioni2014THE MOST DANGEROUS MISTAKES LEADERS MAKE | PATRICK LENCIONI

Mistake #1 — Becoming a leader for the wrong reasons.

We should want to lead because we want to sacrifice ourselves for the good of others, even if we don’t know there will be a return on investment.

Mistake #2 — Failing to embrace vulnerability.

People don’t expect us to be perfect, but they do expect us to be human. You have to be more vulnerable as a pastor because the cost of people not trusting you is so high.

Mistake #3 — Making leadership too important.

Our identity can get wrapped up in being a leader and overshadow who we really are.

At the center of these dangerous mistakes is PRIDE.

Which of these lessons is the most intriguing for you?

 

how do people really growEvery pastor wonders how much difference he is making. I’m no different. I want to know to what degree my personal ministry, as well as our church’s ministry, is really helping people grow in their faith. I ask questions like:

  • Are we truly making disciples or are we just keeping people active?
  • Does activity/participation = growth?
  • Which of our ministries is most effective/ineffective at helping people grow?
  • How do we help all these people that are in such different places?

This summer I read Move: What 1,000 Churches Reveal About Spiritual Growth by Greg Hawkins and Cally Parkinson, and I realized I’m not the only one who asks those kinds of questions. Move is about the lessons from a research project that studied over 1,000 churches by surveying over 200,000 congregants about their spiritual life and development.

As a pastor committed to helping people grow spiritually, I loved the book. It confirmed some of my convictions, surprised me about some of my false assumptions, and challenged me in a few crucial areas.

Confirmation of Convictions

Move affirmed a few of my convictions about ministry. I’ll list these confirmations and provide a quote for each one. PLEASE read the quotes. They’re excellent.

1. People want to be challenged. I’ve seen people respond to challenge time and again.

“Nothing is more indicative of high-impact, discipling churches than a ‘go-for-broke’ challenge factor.” 

2. The Bible is hugely important for spiritual growth. Duh. But, I guess, it’s amazing how many churches don’t really engage people with the Bible. The authors write:

“The most effective strategy for moving people forward in their journey of faith is biblical engagement.”

3. People need different things at different stages of their spiritual life. As nice as one-size-fits-all approaches are for church leadership, they aren’t good for people.

What people need in order to grow closer to Christ depends on where they are now in their relationship with him.” 

4. Christians must have personal time with God in order to grow. Great church programs make little difference if a person isn’t spending time with Jesus.

“Nothing has a greater impact on spiritual growth than reflection on Scripture. If churches could do only one thing to help people at all levels of spiritual maturity grow in their relationship with Christ, their choice is clear. They would inspire, encourage, and equip their people to read the Bible—specifically, to reflect on Scripture for meaning in their lives.”

Surprises (Refuting My Assumptions)

Move also surprised me in a few key areas and refuted my assumptions. Again, please read the quotes.

1. Participation in church activities does not necessarily lead to increased spiritual maturity. Most church leaders assume that if we just get people active, they’ll grow. But, in reality, they’ll only grow to the degree that these activities help them develop a personal relationship with Jesus.

All of our findings are derived from one essential fact: that spiritual growth—defined as an increase in love of God and for others—is not a product of growing participation in church activities or changes in lifestyle or the result of our natural aging process. Rather, spiritual growth advances in lockstep with a growing personal relationship with Christ.” 

2. Organized small groups are more catalytic for people early on and less so later on. This shocked me philosophically, but not experientially. The longer you walk with Jesus, the less you need the organized small group because you have meaningful Christian relationships in real life.

“When we apply our context of human relationships to these findings, it makes perfect sense that organized activities become less important. The closer you are to someone—the more likely you are to depend on them to process your life issues—the less important organized settings tend to be. While you may have formed the relationship in a structured experience—in the workplace, perhaps, or at a neighborhood gathering—that setting is typically a springboard for the relationship, not something required to sustain it.”

3. Serving is the only organized church activity that moves people across all stages of their development. I wasn’t surprised that serving grows people. I was surprised that it was the only organized thing that helped everybody.

Interestingly, serving experiences appear to be even more significant to spiritual development than organized small groups…The implication for church leaders is that we must encourage people to serve—in any capacity, in whatever valid opportunity their gifts and interests lead them to.”

4. Churches need to promote and provide a high-expectation, non-negotiable, senior-pastor-owned pathway of first-steps designed to jumpstart people’s spiritual growth. Rather than just throwing people in the game, churches need to have some basic introductory experience that gets people moving in the right direction.

The military uses boot camp to turn civilians into soldiers. Baseball uses spring training to test new players and try them out in different positions. Many colleges require freshmen to attend orientation week so they can become familiar with their new environment and a new set of expectations. These short-term launching pads into life experiences are analogous to the first best practice found among the most spiritually effective churches in the REVEAL database. They get people moving by providing a high-challenge, nonnegotiable path of first steps to engage people in a process of spiritual growth—a process that will ultimately lead them to become followers of Jesus Christ.”

Challenges I Needed

Finally, Move challenged me in a few key areas. These were things that I knew were important but, for various reasons, had forgotten how crucial they were.

1. The #1 priority of the senior leader(s) must be to make disciples. More than attendance, numerical growth, personal platform, cultural influence, or anything else. This seems obvious, but it’s not. After leading a church for 5+ years, many other things compete for #1 priority. Move challenged me to refocus on what church is all about — making disciples.

Five years of research findings point us to one singular conclusion—that the most essential decision a church leader makes is not what kind of worship service to offer or what kind of small-group system to build. It’s the decision to lead his or her church with an unyielding and unequivocal commitment to a very easy-to-say, very hard-to-accomplish goal—which is, to do whatever is humanly possible to move people’s hearts toward Christ.”

2. The senior leader(s) must have a white-hot relationship with Jesus. Duh, again. But it was a challenge I needed to hear. Nothing would serve our church more than me having a vibrant relationship with Christ.

You cannot reproduce in others what you are not producing in yourself. The main thing you need to do—the one thing you must do—is fully within your reach. You must surrender all.”

You can try other paths, find a new strategy, perhaps, or hire some really talented staff members. But in the end, if your church is not led by people completely devoted to Jesus—people who prioritize their relationship with him above everything else—it will not work. It will not produce life. It will not change the world.”

Conclusion

I thank God for Move. It came just at the right time with a number of fresh insights and important reminders. It will bear fruit in my life and the church. While it’s probably not the kind of book that most Christians will find too interesting, it’s a must-read for senior leaders in a local church.

 

I’ve been teaching a Preaching Lab this summer, where a bunch of men and women are learning the basics of preaching and then preaching a practice sermon. This week one of the participants asked me a good question about the sermon prep process and sermon notes, and I thought I’d share my answer.

Q: When you prepare your sermon, do you rehearse it, if so, how many times, and what does that look like? Is it a “full dress rehearsal”? Do you record or time yourself to make sure you hit all points in allotted time? Or is it more like a rough rehearsal and run through of your outline with guesstimations and or experienced gauging of each point? I think I struggle with this most, because if I just use outline as a backbone, I tend to go over time, but if I stick to notes, I feel stifled and like I’m reading cue cards. Just wondering what your prep looks like.

A: What I do now is very different from where I started and I don’t think I could do what I do now without starting how I started.

When I first got into preaching, I was expected by those who trained me to write out a full manuscript of the message. I didn’t necessarily have to preach from the manuscript, but I had to write it out. This was helpful because it forced me to organize my thoughts, see if they were clear, and think through smooth transitions. It was also helpful because I could read it out loud and gauge how long the sermon would be.

The challenge, however, was that I would often read big chunks from the manuscript during the sermon itself, which is disengaging.

I’ve always admired guys who can preach without notes (Robert Gelinas is one of my favorites). I think it’s more engaging and feels more authoritative, like you really know what you’re talking about.

So one time, about 7-8 years ago, I decided I wanted to try giving a message with zero notes. I figured I would either bomb or it would go well. The fear of bombing and freezing on stage with nothing to say drove me to really get to know the message. So I read the manuscript out loud multiple times, with an almost preaching voice. I created a simple, memorable outline and spent a lot of time learning it. Not memorizing words (I didn’t want to just recite it), but getting so familiar with the content that I could just talk about it.

Thankfully, I didn’t bomb and a number of close friends said it was the best sermon I had given to that point. The lessons were (a) the fewer notes the better and (b) I needed to get to know the content better if I was going to be effective.

When I started preaching weekly in 2009, I tried to do this same basic approach. However, I found that with the other time demands of church planting, getting to zero notes was really hard. So I would write out a manuscript and then turn it into a short, 1 page preaching outline. Over time, I stopped writing out the manuscript and just develop a preaching outline, typically anywhere between 1-3 pages (see an example here). I still work to know the big points and illustrations well so that I don’t have to be too tied to notes. Some messages are better than others.

As far as time and rehearsal, this also has adapted over time. I’ve had times when I’ve “preached to the empty seats” as a way to run things through ahead of time. Nelson Searcy says this “doubles the effectiveness of your preaching.” I still do this sometimes, but usually only if it’s a message that I don’t feel as comfortable with either because I think it’s going to be too long and I need to gauge what to cut or if it’s a particularly tricky message that I want to be sure to get right. For instance, when I preached on homosexuality last year I did a full run-through on stage with the staff in the room to practice and get feedback.

Time is one of those things that I have a feel for from lots of repetition. I can usually gauge about how long it will be from my notes. For somebody without as much experience, the best way to gauge time is to either read the manuscript or practice the sermon.

Nonetheless, it should be noted that I do still struggle to stay within the time (our worship leader could tell you, since we sometimes have to cut a song). Also, I tend to go longer on the second sermon than the first, partly because I think of more things to say and also because there’s a little more flexibility without another service coming. That said, I think around 35-40 minutes is a sweeter spot for me. My favorite preachers usually go about 35 minutes and I’m not as good as them. As Justin Anderson has said, “Sermons are not measured in minutes. They are measured in minutes beyond interest.” I’d rather go shorter and really pack a punch than ramble on. But sometimes I like to hear myself talk.

Hope this helps.

[Click here for other posts on preaching]

I like Jesus, but I don’t really trust the Bible.”

This is a very common thought today. Many people like Jesus (or at least their sanitized, politically correct idea of him), but view the Bible as repressive, outdated, filled with errors, and unnecessary. Can you trust the Bible?

This raises an even more interesting question: What did Jesus think of the Bible?

Kevin DeYoung answered this question was answered magnificently at this year’s Together for the Gospel (T4G) conference. I found his message, “Never Spoke a Man Like This Before: Inerrancy, Evangelism and Christ’s Unbreakable Bible,” to be a truly helpful apologetic for the trustworthiness of Scripture.

I can’t recommend it highly enough.

Watch the video.
Listen to the audio.
Get the T4G podcast.

Last week our church hosted 150 kids from 5-10 years old for Vacation Bible School. This was our third year of VBS and I volunteered to teach. I was assigned to a group of 8 year-olds and it was a fun, tiring week.

shine

Here’s what I learned:

1. Leaders must bring energy. It’s not a secret that kids have energy. Lots of it. So if you want to connect with them relationally, you better bring some energy. Additionally, they respond to and feed off your excitement. This is true in all leadership. Followers feed off the leaders’ energy. It’s why leaders must manage their energy as much as they manage their time. (Here’s a great book on this)

2. Teachers must be engaging. One of the reasons I volunteered was to stretch myself as a communicator. You may ask, “How is teaching kids stretching yourself?” Well, adults are at least polite and self-controlled enough to pretend to listen even when they’re not. But with kids, you can tell instantly whether they’re following you or in la-la land.

Therefore, it’s not enough to teach the material. You have to teach it in an engaging way. You have to ask good questions. You have to use examples they understand and get excited about. You have to adjust your voice inflection to draw them in. You have to tell interesting stories. Otherwise, you might as well not teach it because they won’t get it. Again, this is true in all teaching, just more obvious with kids.

3. Everything’s better with fun. Almost everyone I know likes to have fun, especially kids. When experiences are fun, it makes for better learning and stronger relationships. Sometimes leaders avoid fun because we are so focused on the task at hand or because it feels like a waste of time or money. But I’m leaving this VBS even more committed to making fun part of our leadership culture.

4. Kids know their stuff. It was encouraging to see the kids in my class engage with the story of the gospel. On our last day, we were talking about the crown of righteousness that the Lord will award to those who have loved his appearing (2 Tim 4:8). I asked the kids, “What are some things you would want to do if you thought there was a decent chance Jesus was coming back this afternoon?” Below are their answers.

Honestly, I’m pretty wiped after last week. It was a great experience. Not sure yet whether I’ll do it again next year, but if you’re a leader it’s worth having some experience teaching kids. You’ll grow from it and so will they.

Summer is often a retooling time for churches. Many ministries slow down and it’s an opportunity to adjust before the fall. At Redemption Gateway, we’re in a season where we’re working hard to “get better before bigger.” This phrase comes from Truett Cathy (via Andy Stanley’s podcast) and resonates deeply with us right now.

get-better

Along these lines, I wanted to share a few articles that have challenged me lately and could help any ministry get better.

5 Keys of Effective Leadership Development by Brent Dolfo. Any church that is trying to get better needs to focus on developing more leaders. I think we currently have about 1.5 of these 5 Keys, and we’re kind of known as a church that develops leaders. Still room to grow.

Changing the Real Reason You Don’t Get More Volunteers by Jeff Brodie. We need to get better at recruiting and retaining volunteers. As the church has gotten bigger, this is much harder. This article has an important paradigm shift.

7 Leadership Tensions in Growing Churches by Rich Birch. We read this article together as a staff recently and a lot of it resonated. How you navigate these tensions is crucial.

If you have any resources to share, leave a comment below. I’d love to hear from you as I’m always on the lookout for good resources and articles that will help us get better.

 

think pair shareLeaders must lead engaging discussions. Rallying people always involves conversations that elicit their feedback and encourage their participation. Whether you’re a pastor, a kids ministry teacher or a small group leader, you must lead engaging discussions. One of the most helpful tools for this is “think-pair-share.”

First a story…

About 11 years ago I was helping lead a college ministry and throughout the summer we had a number of events called “summer gatherings” (creative, huh?). Our topic related to Christian Hedonism and the glory of God and I was in charge of leading one of the first gatherings.

We were talking about some BIG things. Deep things. And I just dove in, asking the group of 30-40 collegians right off the bat what they thought about why God created everything, where we find our greatest joy and a bunch of other stuff.

Crickets. Nobody spoke. Well, except for one guy who was the smartest in the room, had been high school valedictorian and went on to earn a theological degree. He was happy to participate, but his participation only made everyone else feel stupid and they withdrew even more. It was a rough night.

Fortunately, my mom was visiting and was in attendance. She’s an experienced school teacher and trainer with The Write Tools, and she said, “I think I have something that will help you: think-pair-share.”

She was right. We used think-pair-share the next week and it was shockingly different. Everyone engaged. Even the timid folks got involved. It was a game-changer. I’ve used it ever since.

How does think-pair-share work?

1. Think. The leader asks a question and gives everyone a few moments to quietly think about their answer. They may even want to write some thoughts down. Few people are instant processors, so this gives them time to gather their thoughts. This is crucial because often the leader has spent hours, days or weeks thinking of an answer to the question and then expects people to engage after thinking about it for two seconds. This stage also gets everyone involved rather than people disengaging because they know the over-eager person in the group will do the thinking for them.

2. Pair. The leader then instructs everyone to turn to a partner and share their thoughts. Sharing with one person is a much easier first step than sharing with the group. This gives them a chance to compare ideas as well as builds confidence that their thoughts are not crazy.

3. Share. Now the leader invites the entire group to share their answers. By this time, everyone has had multiple opportunities to process and confidence is strong. Many good ideas emerge rather than just one quick-thinking person dominating the conversation.

I have found think-pair-share to be crazy simple and shockingly effective. Give it a try and let me know how it goes.

 

Real love is real hard.

Harder than we often think. Reading some of Jesus’ words recently exposed what I think is the hardest part of real love:

[32] “If you love those who love you, what benefit is that to you? For even sinners love those who love them. [33] And if you do good to those who do good to you, what benefit is that to you? For even sinners do the same. [34] And if you lend to those from whom you expect to receive, what credit is that to you? Even sinners lend to sinners, to get back the same amount. [35] But love your enemies, and do good, and lend, expecting nothing in return, and your reward will be great, and you will be sons of the Most High, for he is kind to the ungrateful and the evil. [36] Be merciful, even as your Father is merciful. (Luke 6:32-36 ESV)

The hardest part of real love is “expecting nothing in return.”

Loving this way is what demonstrates that you are a child of God, who loves us this way.

Leader, you know that you are called to love the people in your care. You know that your leadership means nothing if you don’t have love (1 Corinthians 13:2).

Love expects nothing in return. May this reality shape the way you lead and love.